Most companies categorize their website expenses under the general ‘sales and marketing’ header, appropriately, but seem to focus more on the marketing component than the sales one.  Obviously, a well made website can be a key component to the sales pipeline, but it generally sits near the front of the pipeline, helping feed perspective clients into the sales channel, where actual sales staff can take over and complete the sale.  This is inherently bad, and is a huge industry, filled with experts in SEO, inbound marketing, SMM, google Ad Words and other similar technologies.

But what about the other end of the pipeline – the sales component to complement that constant inflow of leads – is your website helping with that?  More directly, your website is helping you open, but is it helping you close sales?  For most of you, your website wouldn’t get any coffee.

So how do you transform your website from a lead generator to a bonafide closer?  Well, it starts with adding components aimed at your sales team, not your customers.  Your site right now is stuffed full of all sorts of helpful information for your customers to check out – detailed product and service descriptions, fresh opinions in the blog, a comprehensive background on your company and staff, and of course all the information on how to make a purchase – but it is probably somewhat lacking in tools for your sales staff.  Your sales staff is there because they have a product and sales expertise that can’t be replicated by a computer or website, and your website can be used as a conduit for them to share this expertise.  Even better, your website is full of helpful presentation material for them to use, only your site probably isn’t equipped for them to leverage it – pasting links into emails is rather inelegant solution compared to professionally designed sales emails, and the sales staff has no idea if the email was even opened, let alone the link clicked on.

Your sales staff is there because they have a product and sales expertise that can’t be replicated by a computer or website, and your website can be used as a conduit for them to share this expertise.

The key component then, is making your site functional for the sales people.  Less sales brochure, more sales kit – real tools they can deploy to contact potential customers, track progress, and close sales.  Out of the box, WordPress just doesn’t have this level of support, but it can be added rather effectively to well built sites – you are, after all, just re-purposing a lot of your already existing content in a new, more helpful, format.  You can send product listings with personalized notes, track email open rates, receive replies, and even create sales flyers, emails and landing pages – your sales team can generate those high performing, professionally designed emails and pages in a few clicks, no computer science degree required.

The fact that most sites are built with an almost entire customer focus is a bit of a legacy tendency, being thought of the same way business cards and sales pamphlets are.  But websites are interactive mediums, not just a transmission method, and it’s important to think about how different groups interact with it.  The take away is to think broadly about your website visitors, who your different users are, and what do they need from your site.  Are they all getting it?  If the group is your marketing staff, probably; if the group is your sales staff, probably not.

Make sure you get both your sales AND marketing from your website, ask GlossyDev how.